MMA Coach Reviews Fight Scenes In Movies


– Hi, I’m Coach Dreifuss from Radical MMA. I’m the head instructor for the MMA and the self-defense program. I’m here to talk about how realistic the fight scenes are in movies. (bell dings) (crowd cheers) First up, it’s a clip from John Wick. And, he does a De la Riva sweep, which is a Jiu-jitsu move, and he does knee on the belly, also a Jiu-jitsu move. That is not realistic. He did an arm lock standing, which he did that here. The scenes look a little
lit bit more Aikido. Oh, great hip throw. Okay, and the clip is over. Brazilian Jiu-jitsu is one
of the premier martial arts that make up mixed martial arts, and it is known for its
control on the ground. And, knee on the belly is one of its standard control positions. He used that, he also
used the mount position. Very, very common in actual fighting. However, there was one
scene where he sort of did some more cinematic Aikido type moves, which are not so effective from that distance in that situation. Also, he did an arm lock standing, and he broke the person’s arm. That arm lock would never
break someone’s arm. Obviously, the movies
are more to entertain, so there has to be some
entertainment element, but they had struck a very nice balance between entertainment and realism. The next clip is Crouching
Tiger, Hidden Dragon. So, here’s the weapon
combat, spear and sword. The cinematic fighting that
they show here is exactly that. Great flexibility. Kip-up, great move. Crouching Tiger, Hidden
Dragon is a great example of the stylistic performance
side of martial art movies. Sword fighting is much dirtier, grittier, and in your face, as you can
see in any actual combat. The other thing is, they’re showing things that are not humanly possible, like smashing an entire table in half. Great movie, but not so realistic at all. The next clip is Casino Royale. Okay, interesting. I wouldn’t say completely unrealistic. Oh, yeah, interesting. He puts his jacket on
to defend the weapon, which is actually a very smart move. Yeah, okay, yeah, that’s kind of what a fight looks like, okay. They’re wrestling around,
right, right, excellent. He puts on a rear naked choke. Not the best choke, old school, but it’s okay, it still works. Yeah, okay, yeah, interesting. What James Bond does is uses his jacket to deflect the machete that
he’s being attacked with. That’s actually pretty common, and what you wanna do when somebody comes at you with a knife is try to get some sort of shield, especially your jacket, around your arm, to stop yourself from getting cut. There’s some upper body grappling where they’re smashing against the wall. This was kinda looked
more gritty, and real, and he finished with the choke, which is a real, legitimate
rear naked choke. Pretty good attempt at
showing a fight scene that is more realistic than cinematic, and had some moves that were
legitimately real moves. Oh, yes, I know this is Kick-Ass. Completely hokey. (laughs) Okay, okay, that was a flying arm bar. And, she’s doing kind of like a pro wrestling thing now. (laughs) Well, obviously throwing
someone into a table does hurt. Very entertaining if
you wanna see something movement oriented and
looks good on the screen, but very little reality here. Force equals mass times acceleration. Without enough mass, which
people under the age of 18 generally don’t have that much mass, so the amount of force
that she can generate is extremely limited. That being said, sometimes leverage can be an equalizer, a force equalizer, and at one point she
does do a flying arm bar, which is a Jiu-jitsu move
or a Judo move, as well. And, that can have a lot
of leverage behind it, where a smaller, weaker
person, even a child, could break an adult’s arm. But, generally speaking,
a very unrealistic, but entertaining fight scene. (groans) The Matrix. Okay. Okay. The punches he’s throwing, the moves he’s doing,
the way he’s blocking, that doesn’t work like that. And kicking at angles, which
there’s absolutely no ability to generate sufficient force, and blocking a punch like
this is not realistic. Entertaining, but complete, complete and pure fantasy. The next clip is from Inception. It’s hard to comment on a fight scene where there’s no gravity. (laughs) And they are kind of grabbing each other, which is what would happen in a fight. And, there’s a hook,
which, that’s kinda real. Not technical, but if
that was a real fight. He’s trying to wrist lock and very poorly. That was actually interesting because obviously there’s a
fantasy or sci-fi setting. The way they’re approaching combat, it seems like they tried to put something a little bit more realistic in there. He threw a hook, like this. That was actually how an
untrained fighter would fight. So, it’s interesting to see that whether it’s Jason Bourne, or John Wick, or some of the newer movies coming out, when they want to depict
a person who’s supposed to be trained as a fighter, they’re really drawing
more on what you see in MMA and seeing what actual
violence looks like. As an MMA instructor,
it is very nice to see what I do reflected on the screen. I think it’s good to be more
realistic than fantastic. (upbeat music)

14 Replies to “MMA Coach Reviews Fight Scenes In Movies

  1. Neo at the end of The Matrix stopping the bullets mid air, MMA Coach: That would not be very realistic in a real fight!!!!!!!

  2. Seriously! Poor choice of movies! He should've only commented on movies where the fight scenes are realistic with no fiction imo!

  3. What is the most realistic fight scene you have seen in a movie? Mine was the fight scene between Benny Urquidez and Jacky Chan.

  4. This guy is a joke.
    Most of these moves exist.
    They exist in various martial arts and he clearly isn't a fan of those.
    So perhaps some stuff isn't used in MMA,because it may not be MMA material.
    What of it?
    That doesn't make it unrealistic and useless.

    There was a video he comented where he mentioned acrobatics don't work.
    Well they do.
    And that includes MMA.
    Mainly those from Capoera and Taekwondo.
    To deny that,he should loose MMA
    licence or something.

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